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Submitted on
April 4, 2009
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3.3 MB
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2592×3872
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Camera Data

Make
NIKON CORPORATION
Model
NIKON D40X
Shutter Speed
10/2000 second
Aperture
F/11.0
Focal Length
105 mm
ISO Speed
400
Date Taken
Mar 28, 2009, 2:58:37 PM
×
Blue Robe a l'Anglaise Front by crookedpin Blue Robe a l'Anglaise Front by crookedpin
This is a robe a l'Anglaise (English gown) that would have been worn during the Revolutionary War. It is meant to be an informal day gown. It is made from a medium blue linen from Wm Booth Draper and lined in white linen from fabrics-store.com. The bodice is cut separately from the skirt, typical of gowns after 1770. It has a center front closure that can be pinned or basted shut (I'm using pins). The petticoat is made of striped linen from Wm Booth Draper. All visible stitching was done by hand.

I used two different patterns to construct this gown- the Mill Farm robe a l'Anglaise and the Period Impressions polonaise. I also modeled portions of the bodice on gown #2 in Fitting and Proper by Sharon Ann Burnston.

The petticoat I'm wearing is made of linen from Wm Booth Draper. The photo doesn't pick up all the colors but it is unbleached linen with narrow dark red, pink, and blue stripes. It is knife pleated with a box pleat at the front and an inverted box pleat at the back, and handsewn to cotton twill tape waistbands/ties.

The shift I'm wearing under this gown was made by April Thomas of 18th Century Gowns, and the cap is from Scarlet Scarab. The hat was purchased as a blank from Smiling Fox Forge and trimmed by me.
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:iconericaxchan:
EricaXchan Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
WANNA BUY!!! 
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:iconmoonlight-rapture:
Moonlight-rapture Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
lovely work, very authentic, nice to see someone else as fussy about the fabric as i am :-P
Reply
:iconcrookedpin:
crookedpin Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Thank you very much! Fabric fussbudgets unite!
Reply
:iconcreedsgalbirdy:
CreedsGalBirdy Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2009
Lovely! Perfect!
Reply
:iconcrookedpin:
crookedpin Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2009  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Thank you! I'm quite proud of it!
Reply
:iconaksarah:
aksarah Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2009
Fantastic work!
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:iconcrookedpin:
crookedpin Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2009  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Thank you very much!
Reply
:iconladyrose04:
ladyrose04 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2009  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
This is lovely. Was it more common to pin the closures or baste them or was it pretty much even?
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:iconcrookedpin:
crookedpin Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2009  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I'm not sure if there's a definitive answer to that question. Looking at the holes in the closures of extant gowns only lets us know that the gown was either basted or pinned shut, but there's no way to really know which was used on that particular garment. I would guess that pins were more common, only because it would be easier to get dressed and undressed by yourself- but that's only speculation. I've even heard that the thorns of the hawthorn were used as pins to hold garments closed.
Reply
:iconangelsamui:
AngelSamui Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2009  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Beautiful work and I love the blue you picked
Reply
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